Victoria Falls

These are among the most spectacular waterfalls in the world. The Zambezi River, more than two kilometres wide at this point, plunges noisily down a series of basalt gorges and raises an iridescent mist that can be seen more than 20 kilometres away.

The Victoria Falls are the most significant feature of the Victoria Falls National Park, and when the Zambezi is in full flood (usually February or March) they form the largest curtain of falling water in the world. During these months, over 500 million litres of water per minute go over the falls, which are 1708m wide, and drop 99m at Rainbow Falls in Zambia.

At low water in November the flow can be reduced to around 10 million litres/minute, and the river is divided into a series of braided channels that descend in many separate falls. Below the falls the river enters a narrow series of gorges which represent locations successively occupied by the falls earlier in their history.

Victoria Falls attract many ‘extreme’ sports lovers; bungee jumping off the Zambezi Bridge, white water rafting and body boarding are just a few options available.

Less adventurous visitors will enjoy walking through the National Park, where there are excellent viewing points. The spectacular views that can be obtained by taking a helicopter or light aircraft ‘flight of the angels’ are unforgettable!


 

Hwange National Park 

Hwange National Park (formerly Wankie) is the largest game reserve in Zimbabwe. The park is situated in the north west, on the main road between Buluwayo and the world famous Victoria Falls.

It was founded around 1928 by a 22-year-old game ranger, Ted Davidson. Hwange National Park covers over 14,600 square kilometres. The park is close to the edge of the Kalahari desert, a region with little water and very sparse, semi-arid vegetation.

The Park carries 105 mammal species, including 19 large herbivores and eight large carnivores. All Zimbabwe’s specially protected animals are to be found in Hwange and it is the only protected area where gemsbok and brown hyena occur in reasonable numbers.

The population of African wild dogs to be found in Hwange is thought to be of one of the largest surviving groups in Africa today.

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